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Roundworms

Discussions relating to Drug Laws

Roundworms

Postby Peadar » Sat Dec 03, 2016 5:30 pm

My husband bought a puppy off the side of the road and after it was around my children for 2 days we noticed a large worm in its feces. I have recently taken my puppy to the vet and she was diagnosed with roundworms, I have a 16 month old and a 4 yr old and after reading one of your responses to how roundworms effect the human body i am freaking out my question is, how do i clean the areas, and carpets best? how long can a egg live in our carpets? how long before i can let the animal around the children? And if the dog eats it's own feces can it reinfect itself? I am also scared to let the children out in the yard now, should i be worried and if so for how long?
Peadar
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Jan 18, 2014 5:44 pm

Roundworms

Postby gideon » Mon Dec 05, 2016 2:19 pm

Hi Heidi,

Thank you for writing to me about your new puppy's round worm infestation.  Bless you for rescuing this innocent and wonderful dog!

Following is information regarding your situation as described by a vet: Roundworms(Toxocara canis) are common intestinal nematode parasites of dogs. The parasite is extremely common in puppies; however, a strong immunity begins to develop in most dogs by 2-3 months of age. Consequently, in well-cared-for pet dogs that have been dewormed as young puppies, infection is uncommon. But young dogs with suppressed immunity due to malnourishment or some other concurrent disease(such as is common in stray dogs) are likely to be infected. Roundworms have a complex life cycle; following infection, larval worms undergo an extensive migration through the liver and lungs before migrating back to the intestine where they complete their development and begin to shed eggs into the feces.

Once in the environment, it takes several weeks for the eggs to develop to the infective stage. Infective roundworm eggs in the environment are a public health concern because people that ingest these eggs can become infected with these parasites. But humans are not the normal host of this parasite; thus the worm does not undergo its normal migratory path and "gets lost" while traveling through the human body. Ocular larva migrans(OLM) occurs when roundworm larvae migrate into the eye; this occurs most commonly in children 6-14 years old. OLM is a very serious disease and can cause blindness if not promptly and appropriately treated. In children younger than 5 years, roundworm larvae tend to migrate in the organs, a disease called visceral larva migrans(VLM). Most children with VLM have no symptoms, but in a small percentage of cases in which large numbers of infective eggs are ingested, a variety of symptoms are seen depending upon the organ(s) affected.

Roundworm eggs are shed exclusively in the feces; therefore, very few eggs will be found in areas that are not contaminated with dog feces. Also, because it takes 2 weeks for eggs to become infective after being shed in the feces, direct contact with roundworm-infected dogs has very low risk for infection(risk is not zero, however, because small numbers of eggs have been recovered from the hair coats of puppies that are infected with roundworms). Consequently, even when there is a roundworm-infected dog in the home, areas inside the home will have very few, if any, infective roundworm eggs, and children's toys should be essentially free of infective eggs.

The importance of roundworm egg contamination of the yard is exacerbated by the fact that eggs can remain viable for many months(even for several years if in a protected location), and it is virtually impossible to kill the eggs with chemical disinfectants. Thus, the backyard is the major source of infective eggs to children. The eggs only can be readily killed by extreme heat(steam or flame) or long-term exposure(weeks to months) to UV radiation(direct sunlight). Therefore, sunny areas of the yard will become safe long before shaded areas. Once the yard becomes contaminated with roundworm eggs, there is little that can be done to remove or kill the eggs other than waiting for eggs to die naturally or physically removing the surface soil layer. Good hygiene, handwashing, and prevention of pica is extremely important in reducing the risk for infection on a contaminated property.

Because of the importance of roundworms to the health of both dogs and humans, veterinarians recommend that all puppies be treated at regular intervals and that all adult dogs be tested and treated as needed. The American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists, together with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have issued recommendations to treat all puppies at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks. It is also recommended to then place all dogs on a monthly heartworm preventative that also kills roundworms. Worms are killed rapidly following treatment with appropriate drugs, and treated dogs will cease shedding eggs within 2 days following treatment. Therefore, proper veterinary care of newborn puppies and immediate veterinary examination and treatment of all newly acquired pet dogs(whether strays or from another source), together with regular feces pickup, can virtually eliminate the risk for transmission to children in the home. Outside of the home(such as playgrounds), it is important that leash and clean-up laws are observed diligently.

Ray M. Kaplan, DVM, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Infectious Diseases; Director, Parasitology Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens

In my opinion it is essential to use a steamer in your home.  According to the article, heat can kill these worms and eggs so for very little money, you can purchase a steamer from a department store like Walmart and steam every single area of your home.  Since your puppy is on medication, it is unlikely that any new contamination will ensue.  

Diatomaceous Earth is a substance that the roundworms like to swallow. Diatomaceaous is actually a fossilized algae that has razor-sharp edges. When swallowed, the substance’s sharp edges tear the worm apart as it passes through the worm's body. This cuts the worm from inside out, causing it to dehydrate to death. You can buy a food grade(very important) bag of diatomaceous earth and sprinkle it in your yard where it is shady.  Remember that the sun will kill the worms in areas where it shines.  Keep your children away from the area where the dust is sprinkled until it either rains or you hose it into the ground.  It is most effective when dry.  You can also sprinkle it into the carpet and floor but again, keep your children, and the dog away from it until you vacuum it up.  It is breathing in the dust that is dangerous, not touching it.

You can also consider boric acid but follow the same precautions as diatomaceous earth.  I have found that boric acid can also kill plants, while diatomaceous earth doesn't seem to.

Here is a list of holistic approaches to problems around the home:

• Ants – allow these "lesser of the environmental evils" to survive as they feed on flea eggs and larvae • Boric acid products – contain a powder that attacks the outer "protective layer" of the offending parasite – most often flea larvae - by drying it out; can be applied to your dog’s "environment"(e.g. bedding, carpeting) and directly on them too, if used cautiously(the dust can be irritating to the lungs) • Diatomaceous earth products – contain a powder made from the hard outer shell of single-celled algae(i.e. diatoms) that generally works in the same manner as boric acid; can also be added to food to help rid your dog of roundworms and other various parasites • Essential oils - including eucalyptus, cedar, and rosemary • Flea combs - should be used daily and any fleas that are found should be "drowned" in soapy water • Flea traps - use light and/or heat to capture fleas in water or on "sticky traps" • Herbal products to be applied topically - including collars, powders, sprays, shampoos, and towelettes that contain such herbs as citronella, eucalyptus, lavender, lemon, neem, and penny royal. • Herbal products to be ingested – including powders, pills, and liquid drops(e.g. tinctures that are made much like flower essences but that are extracted using grain alcohol instead of water); contain such herbs as black walnut green hulls, cloves, and wormwood(the combination of those three herbs is said to be effective at killing more than one hundred species of parasites, including all of the various "developmental stages") • Homeopathic remedies – including Chenopodium, Cina, Filix mas, Sulphur, and nosodes for heartworm • Mosquito dunks and/or drops – contain a naturally occurring bacteria that is only toxic to certain insects; can be added directly to bodies of mosquito-laden water(e.g. birdbaths, ponds) • Natural predators – put up purple martin bird houses and bat boxes to aid these parasite-eating predators • Nematode worm products – can be regularly applied to your yard as they feed off of flea larvae and other outdoor pests(e.g. grubs) • Ultrasonic "repelling" devices - including collars and combs • Vitamins and supplements - including B vitamins, brewers yeast, garlic(in moderation), and essential fatty acids • Vacuum your home often and immediately dispose of its contents outside of the home • Wash your pet’s bedding weekly in very hot, soapy water The use of such "natural" parasite-controlling products and practices will likely have fewer negative side effects on your dog than if you use their chemical-based counterparts. Your own home environment will also likely have less "toxic residue" than if you used chemical products. Most holistic veterinarians and other holistic practitioners will tell you that they believe the use of chemical-based parasite products will actually weaken your dog’s immune system, thereby doing more harm than good to their overall health and well-being. In such a compromised health condition, they’ll actually be more vulnerable to a parasitic attack. Many holistic practitioners might also tell you that the risk posed by a population of parasites is far less than the risks associated with using "toxic" control products. Here's wishing you the very best in your quest to protect your family and your dog.  I think that everything will be fine if you follow all the guidelines.  Engage your children's participation in this project.  Eventually there won't be any more roundworms to worry about.  I also suggest that you have your dog tested for Giardia, a parasite that is also contageous to humans.  

Remember that information is power and once you have the information at your fingertips, you have the power to live in a safe and healthy environment!

Best Regards,

Shelley Davis

I think that if you follow these suggestions, plus hand washing, that you and your family will do just fine.  
gideon
 
Posts: 48
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2011 12:52 am

Roundworms

Postby Sprowle » Wed Dec 07, 2016 6:00 pm

My husband bought a puppy off the side of the road and after it was around my children for 2 days we noticed a large worm in its feces. I have recently taken my puppy to the vet and she was diagnosed with roundworms, I have a 16 month old and a 4 yr old and after reading one of your responses to how roundworms effect the human body i am freaking out my question is, how do i clean the areas, and carpets best? how long can a egg live in our carpets? how long before i can let the animal around the children? And if the dog eats it's own feces can it reinfect itself? I am also scared to let the children out in the yard now, should i be worried and if so for how long?
Sprowle
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2014 10:10 am


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