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Puritans

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Puritans

Postby Healum » Sun Dec 04, 2016 10:42 am

What was puritan family life like?

How did the puritan's religion effect their everyday life?

What where the religious leaders like? what were their views on the religion?

Please answer fast! :)

- Alex
Healum
 
Posts: 47
Joined: Mon Jan 06, 2014 8:18 pm

Puritans

Postby Pembroke » Mon Dec 05, 2016 8:16 pm

   Hope you have a comfortable and happy THANKSGIVING, Alex. Here's your answers:    Puritans usually migrated to New England as a family unit, a pattern different from other colonies where young, single men often came on their own. Puritan men of the generation of the Great Migration(1630–1640) believed that a good Puritan wife did not linger in Britain. Although without property in New England, a wife had some real authority in the family, although hers derived from different sources from her husband's. Because the laws of God explicitly informed the earliest laws of the Massachusetts civil code, a husband could not legally command his wife anything contrary to God's word.     Puritan marriage choices were influenced by young people’s inclination, by parents, and by the social rank of the persons involved. Upon finding a suitable match, husband and wife in America followed the steps needed to legitimize their marriage, including: 1) a contract, comparable to today’s practice of engagement; 2) the announcement of this contract; 3) execution of the contract at a church; 4) a celebration of the event at the home of the groom and 5) sexual intercourse. Problems with consummation could terminate marriage: if a groom proved impotent, the contract between him and his bride dissolved, an act enforced by the courts.     The courts could also enforce the duty of a husband to support his wife, as English Common Law provided that when a woman married, she gave all her property to her husband and became a feme covert, losing her separate civil identity in his. In so doing, she legally accepted her role as managing her husband’s household, fulfilling her duty of “keep[ing] at home, educating her children, keeping and improving what is got by the industry of man.”     Puritan culture emphasized the need for self-examination and the strict accounting for one’s feelings as well as one’s deeds. This was the center of evangelical experience, which women in turn placed at the heart of their work to sustain family life. The words of the Bible, as they interpreted them, were the origin of many Puritan cultural ideals, especially regarding the roles of men and women in the community. While both sexes carried the stain of original sin, for a girl, original sin suggested more than the roster of Puritan character flaws. Eve’s corruption, in Puritan eyes, extended to all women, and justified marginalizing them within churches' hierarchical structures.     An example is the different ways that men and women were made to express their conversion experiences. For full membership, the Puritan church insisted not only that its congregants lead godly lives and exhibit a clear understanding of the main tenets of their Christian faith, but they also must demonstrate that they had experienced true evidence of the workings of God’s grace in their souls. Only those who gave a convincing account of such a conversion could be admitted to full church membership. While women were typically not permitted to speak in church, they were allowed to engage in religious discussions outside of it, and they could narrate their conversions.[citation needed]     The English Puritan William Gouge wrote:     “…a familie is a little Church, and a little common-wealth, at least a lively representation thereof, whereby triall may be made of such as are fit for any place of authoritie, or of subjection in Church or commonwealth. Or rather it is as a schoole wherein the first principles and grounds of government and subjection are learned: whereby men are fitted to greater matters in Church or common-wealth.”     Order in the family, then, fundamentally structured Puritan belief. The essence of social order lay in the authority of husband over wife, parents over children, and masters over servants in the family. John White wrote in his Genesis commentary of a wife as "but a helper", a view called "typically puritan" by Philip C. Almond.[26]     Ideas of proper order both sharply defined and confined a woman’s authority. Indeed, God's word often prescribed important roles of authority for women; the Complete Body of Divinity stated that:     “…as to Servants, the Metaphorical and Synecdochial usage of the words Father and Mother, heretofore observed, implys it; for tho’ the Husband be the Head of the Wife, yet she is an Head of the Family.”       Samuel Sewall, a magistrate, advised his son’s servant that “he could not obey his Master without obedience to his Mistress; and vice versa.”     Authority and obedience characterized the relationship between Puritan parents and their children. Proper love meant proper discipline; , the family was the basic unit of supervision. A breakdown in family rule indicated a disregard of God’s order.     That's it from here, my friend. Take care and stay safe.                                       HANK
Pembroke
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Thu Jan 30, 2014 5:45 am

Puritans

Postby Brando » Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:07 am

What was puritan family life like?

How did the puritan's religion effect their everyday life?

What where the religious leaders like? what were their views on the religion?

Please answer fast! :)

- Alex
Brando
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Jan 12, 2014 8:18 am


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