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Public Humiliation

Family Law Discussion Forum

Public Humiliation

Postby gofraidh34 » Sun Dec 04, 2016 10:14 am

I attend Grad school in a university in Virginia.  It is a healthcare program.  While attending, a rumor circulated that I was homosexual.  This inevitably made it's way to the faculty.  Every year ascending students are assigned by faculty an incoming student to mentor.  This includes being the "patient" for the student's hands on test, and a ceremony in front of the school, faculty, administrators and family members where you walk on stage and dress them in a white lab coat.  In short the faculty felt it appropriate to pair me up with an openly gay incoming student. After the white coat ceremony I was not only offended by the act but emotionally distressed on the outcome. Since then, my relationship with classmates have been strained and my school work has suffered.  Is there any actions I can take in this matter?
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Public Humiliation

Postby Sruthair » Mon Dec 05, 2016 7:50 am

I attend Grad school in a university in Virginia.  It is a healthcare program.  While attending, a rumor circulated that I was homosexual.  This inevitably made it's way to the faculty.  Every year ascending students are assigned by faculty an incoming student to mentor.  This includes being the "patient" for the student's hands on test, and a ceremony in front of the school, faculty, administrators and family members where you walk on stage and dress them in a white lab coat.  In short the faculty felt it appropriate to pair me up with an openly gay incoming student. After the white coat ceremony I was not only offended by the act but emotionally distressed on the outcome. Since then, my relationship with classmates have been strained and my school work has suffered.  Is there any actions I can take in this matter?
Sruthair
 
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Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:33 pm

Public Humiliation

Postby Kohana » Mon Dec 05, 2016 11:23 pm

Dear Karl,

Before I respond further to your question, I must make clear that I do not represent you, and cannot give you individual particularized legal advice. No attorney client relationship is created by this email. For legal advice, you should hire your own attorney, and follow their advice. My role with AllExperts is limited to providing general information and suggestions for educational or general knowledge purposes.

Before you take any action, consult with your own attorney.  Speak to an attorney licensed to practice law in your state about the strengths, weaknesses, and likely outcomes of any contemplated cause of action or defense.

Probably.  Cases have been won concerning same sex discrimination.  Regardless of your sexual orientation, the law in most states, and perhaps even in the Commonwealth of Virginia, permits recovery for obnoxious sexual harassment.

In civil court, sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination, and you could sue under the the Commonwealth's equivalent to my state's Minnesota Human Rights Act, 363A.02.  Here, if you can establish that conduct "which impacts on the conditions of employment when the employer knew or should have known of the employees' conduct alleged to constitute sexual harassment and fails to take timely and appropriate action" occurred, you could win money from your employer to compensate you.  Check with your lawyer about the particulars local authority requires.

Often, a nasty demand, or what I call a "Rattlesnake" letter from your attorney can turn things around, if not make up entirely for past nonsense already endured.  Most attorneys will issue a rattlesnake letter for a nominal fee, and help you adapt, improvise and overcome whatever develops.

Another inexpensive solution is to contact the police, or Attorney General of your state/Commonwealth and make a complaint.  Your tax dollars already pays those folks' salaries, so you ought to use them.

Finally, unless you are homophobic, consider contacting gay or gay friendly organizations to see if they are willing to help.  People that are sick of being discriminated against frequently like to help others stand up and strike back against discrimination; even if they are not exactly like you.

I hope this helps, good luck to you.

Morgan Smith

SMITH & RAVER LLP

Minneapolis, Minnesotahttp://smith-and-raver-llp.biz

Conciliation Court * Civil Litigation * Forfeitures * Construction * Family Law
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