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Preparation For Cic

Workers Compensation Law Discussion

Preparation For Cic

Postby Ignado » Fri Nov 25, 2016 12:37 am

In preparation for my first CIC course and exam- are there any tips that you can provide to help get started?

For the exam are you allowed to bring any notes?

ANSWER: Stephanie;

Absolutely!!! First and foremost, sit in the front few rows, most everyone who's taking the exam will be in this area and you may find a study partner, or at least get more assistance. The book you're going to get will be HUGE! Don't let that intimidate you. There is going to be plenty of material in the book that are examples, exhibits, or just topics that the instructor doesn't quite get to. CIC Exams are written as the very class you're in proceeds, in other words, it's not a standard exam for Casualty, one for Property, etc.... The facilitator in the back of the room is the one writing the test questions each day. So, if a topic is specifically addressed in the class, there could be a question on that subject on the exam. If they spend a LOT of time on a subject, you KNOW it will be on the exam. And conversely, if a topic is not discussed in class, it will NOT be on the exam so don't waste any time studying that material. Take a lot of notes and study. I studied each night, re-writing my notes from that day, etc... That way, if there's something that you need clarification on, you can ask the instructors or classmates, the following day. You don't want to find there's something you needed clarification on and now it's Friday night with the exam the next morning. Stay for the exam briefing that the facilitator will do, most likely on the very first day after the instructor is done. You get partial credit for answers so even if you don't know the whole answer, write down anything and everything you can recall. Don't ever leave a question blank. The test will be 20 questions and the total points that each question is worth will be listed on the test. You need 70 to pass. And my last bit of advice that I think every CIC would tell you, don't think that you know a particular subject well enough to skate through and pass the test. Prime example, I failed Casualty the first time around because I thought I knew just about everything there was to know on the topic, WRONG!! I didn't study as much as I had for other classes and it showed in my test results.  

I hope this has helped! Congrats on pursuing your CIC and I wish you the best of luck!!!

Kristen

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

Thank you Kristen.

As a follow-up question - Are you allowed to take any of your notes into the test with you?

I have reviewed and printed off all of the standard "helpful hints" for studying CIC.  I have also reached out to others that have taken the course before and have reviewed their manuals.

I am just trying to pre-study and prepare myself for any items that i might be able to start to study now and not have to cram so much information in within such a short time span.  I want to be able to really retain some of the information.

Thanks,

Stephanie
Ignado
 
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2014 1:13 am

Preparation For Cic

Postby Taggart » Fri Nov 25, 2016 8:58 am

In preparation for my first CIC course and exam- are there any tips that you can provide to help get started?

For the exam are you allowed to bring any notes?

ANSWER: Stephanie;

Absolutely!!! First and foremost, sit in the front few rows, most everyone who's taking the exam will be in this area and you may find a study partner, or at least get more assistance. The book you're going to get will be HUGE! Don't let that intimidate you. There is going to be plenty of material in the book that are examples, exhibits, or just topics that the instructor doesn't quite get to. CIC Exams are written as the very class you're in proceeds, in other words, it's not a standard exam for Casualty, one for Property, etc.... The facilitator in the back of the room is the one writing the test questions each day. So, if a topic is specifically addressed in the class, there could be a question on that subject on the exam. If they spend a LOT of time on a subject, you KNOW it will be on the exam. And conversely, if a topic is not discussed in class, it will NOT be on the exam so don't waste any time studying that material. Take a lot of notes and study. I studied each night, re-writing my notes from that day, etc... That way, if there's something that you need clarification on, you can ask the instructors or classmates, the following day. You don't want to find there's something you needed clarification on and now it's Friday night with the exam the next morning. Stay for the exam briefing that the facilitator will do, most likely on the very first day after the instructor is done. You get partial credit for answers so even if you don't know the whole answer, write down anything and everything you can recall. Don't ever leave a question blank. The test will be 20 questions and the total points that each question is worth will be listed on the test. You need 70 to pass. And my last bit of advice that I think every CIC would tell you, don't think that you know a particular subject well enough to skate through and pass the test. Prime example, I failed Casualty the first time around because I thought I knew just about everything there was to know on the topic, WRONG!! I didn't study as much as I had for other classes and it showed in my test results.  

I hope this has helped! Congrats on pursuing your CIC and I wish you the best of luck!!!

Kristen

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

Thank you Kristen.

As a follow-up question - Are you allowed to take any of your notes into the test with you?

I have reviewed and printed off all of the standard "helpful hints" for studying CIC.  I have also reached out to others that have taken the course before and have reviewed their manuals.

I am just trying to pre-study and prepare myself for any items that i might be able to start to study now and not have to cram so much information in within such a short time span.  I want to be able to really retain some of the information.

Thanks,

Stephanie
Taggart
 
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Jan 19, 2014 10:51 pm

Preparation For Cic

Postby Lon » Mon Nov 28, 2016 1:47 am

Stephanie;

I want to caution you NOT to read other manuals, notes, etc... every single CIC is different. No two are the same. The same instructors are never used in the same location, the same material isn't used, etc... and as I mentioned, the test is class specific, your test questions will, more than likely, not have anything to do with other classes that have occurred before you. You're doing a lot of extra work, cramming in a lot of extra information and it's unnecessary. It could actually be confusing and mean that you wind up answering questions on the test incorrectly, or with information that may be correct, but wasn't presented during your class which means no points. The facilitator knows what is and what is not presented during every single class, and it's different for each class. That's why the test is written on site, as the class progresses. Not to mention that the material is always updated for current legal cases, laws, etc... the manuals you're reviewing from previous classes may have information that is no longer current or correct. Focus on the material presented in the class that you actually attend, spend extra time studying any area that the instructor spends extra time on, and you'll be fine. Trust me, once you've been through one CIC exam, you'll know exactly what to expect for the remaining 4. I'm assuming your class begins this Wednesday. You're going to do just fine!! Good luck!

Kristen
Lon
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2014 4:50 pm


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