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Workers Compensation Law Discussion

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Postby anynnawg3 » Thu Dec 01, 2016 1:06 am

2. Pearl Engineering

Pearl Engineering Company was a large heavy-engineering unit. It attached great importance to the recruitment and training of its senior supervisors. Apart from selecting them from within the organization, the company recruited, every. Alternate year, about ten young engineering graduates and offered them training for a period of two years, before they were appointed as senior supervisors. Such appointments were made to about 40 per cent of the vacancies of senior supervisors that occurred in the organization. This was considered necessary by management as a planned programme of imparting vitality to the organization. Besides, many of the old-timers, who had risen from the ranks, did not possess the necessary academic background with the result that they could not keep pace with the technological changes. Management also believed that in the rapidly changing conditions of industry, a bank of technically competent supervisors played a pivotal role, besides serving as a pool from which to select future departmental managers.

Engineering Graduates were selected from amongst those who applied in response to an all-India advertisement. For the selection of one engineer, on an average, eight applicants were called for interview. A selection committee consisting of the General Manager, the Production Manager, the Personnel Manager and the Training Officer interviewed and selected the candidates. The selection interview was preceded by a written test and only those who secured 40 per cent marks qualified for interview.

The engineers thus selected had to undergo a two year intensive theoretical and practical training. A well-staffed and equipped Training Institute was directly responsible for the training of the graduate engineers, besides training trade apprentices and operatives required by the company. Lectures on theoretical subjects were given at the Training Institute and practical training was imparted in all the works departments under the guidance of qualified and experienced instructors. A few lectures by senior officers of the company were also arranged to acquaint them with the company policies on different matters. During the last quarter of their two-year training programme they were deputed to work fulltime to familiarize themselves with the conditions in departments where they were to be absorbed eventually.

On successful completion of training, the graduate engineers were offered appointments, depending on their performance and aptitude as revealed during training. On placement in the work departments, however, most of them faced some difficulty or the other.

According to management, some of the heads of departments, who were themselves not qualified engineers, did not have sufficient confidence in these younger men. They preferred the subordinates who came up from the ranks to hold positions of responsibility. A few discredited them saying that it would take years before these youngsters could pick up the job. Besides, some of the employees, whose promotional opportunities were adversely affected by the placement of graduate engineers, tried their best to run down the latter as a class, sometimes working on the group feelings of the workers. Some of the supervisors who were not graduate engineers also spoke derisively of them as "the blue-eyed boys" of the organization. Management knew that many of the graduate engineers were not utilized according to their capacity or training, nor was any attempt made to test or develop their potentialities. They also knew that many of the graduate engineers were, therefore, dissatisfied with their work life. Some of them who did not get equal promotional opportunities as their colleagues placed in other departments, were looking for better jobs elsewhere.

On the other hand, according to management, the young graduate engineers were themselves partly responsible for the hostile attitude of others in the organization. Some of them failed to appreciate that a newcomer invited hostility in the beginning and it took time before he was accepted as a member of the work-group. They did not realize that they would be fully productive only after gaining about five to seven years experience in the organization. A few thought that they belonged to a superior cadre and threw their weight around. They did not bother to understand and appreciate the problems of the rank-and-file of employees who worked under them.

In spite of these drawback, the General Manager of the company felt that these men were a set of disciplined supervisors. They had a sense of pride in their profession, and with the extensive training they had received, they would be able to take up any responsible position in the organization in course of time.

The General Manager could not allow the situation to continue especially when it was a difficult and costly process to recruit and train young engineering graduates of the requisite type and caliber. He knew that the prosperity of the company, to a large extent, depended on these young men. In addition, a large number of lucrative employment opportunities were available to these young engineers elsewhere and there was a systematic raid on them, He, therefore, called a meeting of all heads of departments to review the situation.

s:(i) Identify the issues related to manpower planning as evident in the case.

(ii) Discuss the strategies to tackle the percentage of internal promotion at the organizational level.

(iii)What type of additional training programmes should be imparted for direct entrants?

(iv) Suppose you are the head of the personnel division. What would be your suggestions in the meeting - Which has been called by the General Manager?
anynnawg3
 
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2013 1:42 pm

Hr

Postby Gau » Fri Dec 02, 2016 5:43 am

2. Pearl Engineering

Pearl Engineering Company was a large heavy-engineering unit. It attached great importance to the recruitment and training of its senior supervisors. Apart from selecting them from within the organization, the company recruited, every. Alternate year, about ten young engineering graduates and offered them training for a period of two years, before they were appointed as senior supervisors. Such appointments were made to about 40 per cent of the vacancies of senior supervisors that occurred in the organization. This was considered necessary by management as a planned programme of imparting vitality to the organization. Besides, many of the old-timers, who had risen from the ranks, did not possess the necessary academic background with the result that they could not keep pace with the technological changes. Management also believed that in the rapidly changing conditions of industry, a bank of technically competent supervisors played a pivotal role, besides serving as a pool from which to select future departmental managers.

Engineering Graduates were selected from amongst those who applied in response to an all-India advertisement. For the selection of one engineer, on an average, eight applicants were called for interview. A selection committee consisting of the General Manager, the Production Manager, the Personnel Manager and the Training Officer interviewed and selected the candidates. The selection interview was preceded by a written test and only those who secured 40 per cent marks qualified for interview.

The engineers thus selected had to undergo a two year intensive theoretical and practical training. A well-staffed and equipped Training Institute was directly responsible for the training of the graduate engineers, besides training trade apprentices and operatives required by the company. Lectures on theoretical subjects were given at the Training Institute and practical training was imparted in all the works departments under the guidance of qualified and experienced instructors. A few lectures by senior officers of the company were also arranged to acquaint them with the company policies on different matters. During the last quarter of their two-year training programme they were deputed to work fulltime to familiarize themselves with the conditions in departments where they were to be absorbed eventually.

On successful completion of training, the graduate engineers were offered appointments, depending on their performance and aptitude as revealed during training. On placement in the work departments, however, most of them faced some difficulty or the other.

According to management, some of the heads of departments, who were themselves not qualified engineers, did not have sufficient confidence in these younger men. They preferred the subordinates who came up from the ranks to hold positions of responsibility. A few discredited them saying that it would take years before these youngsters could pick up the job. Besides, some of the employees, whose promotional opportunities were adversely affected by the placement of graduate engineers, tried their best to run down the latter as a class, sometimes working on the group feelings of the workers. Some of the supervisors who were not graduate engineers also spoke derisively of them as "the blue-eyed boys" of the organization. Management knew that many of the graduate engineers were not utilized according to their capacity or training, nor was any attempt made to test or develop their potentialities. They also knew that many of the graduate engineers were, therefore, dissatisfied with their work life. Some of them who did not get equal promotional opportunities as their colleagues placed in other departments, were looking for better jobs elsewhere.

On the other hand, according to management, the young graduate engineers were themselves partly responsible for the hostile attitude of others in the organization. Some of them failed to appreciate that a newcomer invited hostility in the beginning and it took time before he was accepted as a member of the work-group. They did not realize that they would be fully productive only after gaining about five to seven years experience in the organization. A few thought that they belonged to a superior cadre and threw their weight around. They did not bother to understand and appreciate the problems of the rank-and-file of employees who worked under them.

In spite of these drawback, the General Manager of the company felt that these men were a set of disciplined supervisors. They had a sense of pride in their profession, and with the extensive training they had received, they would be able to take up any responsible position in the organization in course of time.

The General Manager could not allow the situation to continue especially when it was a difficult and costly process to recruit and train young engineering graduates of the requisite type and caliber. He knew that the prosperity of the company, to a large extent, depended on these young men. In addition, a large number of lucrative employment opportunities were available to these young engineers elsewhere and there was a systematic raid on them, He, therefore, called a meeting of all heads of departments to review the situation.

s:(i) Identify the issues related to manpower planning as evident in the case.

(ii) Discuss the strategies to tackle the percentage of internal promotion at the organizational level.

(iii)What type of additional training programmes should be imparted for direct entrants?

(iv) Suppose you are the head of the personnel division. What would be your suggestions in the meeting - Which has been called by the General Manager?
Gau
 
Posts: 37
Joined: Sat Apr 19, 2014 4:10 am

Hr

Postby Matro » Sun Dec 04, 2016 3:44 am

:   2. Pearl Engineering

Pearl Engineering Company was a large heavy-engineering unit. It attached great importance to the recruitment and training of its senior supervisors. Apart from selecting them from within the organization, the company recruited, every. Alternate year, about ten young engineering graduates and offered them training for a period of two years, before they were appointed as senior supervisors. Such appointments were made to about 40 per cent of the vacancies of senior supervisors that occurred in the organization. This was considered necessary by management as a planned programme of imparting vitality to the organization. Besides, many of the old-timers, who had risen from the ranks, did not possess the necessary academic background with the result that they could not keep pace with the technological changes. Management also believed that in the rapidly changing conditions of industry, a bank of technically competent supervisors played a pivotal role, besides serving as a pool from which to select future departmental managers.

Engineering Graduates were selected from amongst those who applied in response to an all-India advertisement. For the selection of one engineer, on an average, eight applicants were called for interview. A selection committee consisting of the General Manager, the Production Manager, the Personnel Manager and the Training Officer interviewed and selected the candidates. The selection interview was preceded by a written test and only those who secured 40 per cent marks qualified for interview.

The engineers thus selected had to undergo a two year intensive theoretical and practical training. A well-staffed and equipped Training Institute was directly responsible for the tra ining of the graduate engineers, besides training trade apprentices and operatives required by the company. Lectures on theoretical subjects were given at the Training Institute and practical training was imparted in all the works departments under the guidance of qualified and experienced instructors. A few lectures by senior officers of the company were also arranged to acquaint them with the company policies on different matters. During the last quarter of their two-year training programme they were deputed to work fulltime to familiarize themselves with the conditions in departments where they were to be absorbed eventually.

On successful completion of training, the graduate engineers were offered appointments, depending on their performance and aptitude as revealed during training. On placement in the work departments, however, most of them faced some difficulty or the other.

According to management, some of the heads of departments, who were themselves not qualified engineers, did not have sufficient confidence in these younger men. They preferred the subordinates who came up from the ranks to hold positions of responsibility. A few discredited them saying that it would take years before these youngsters could pick up the job. Besides, some of the employees, whose promotional opportunities were adversely affected by the placement of graduate engineers, tried their best to run down the latter as a class, sometimes working on the group feelings of the workers. Some of the supervisors who were not graduate engineers also spoke derisively of them as "the blue-eyed boys" of the organization. Management knew that many of the graduate engineers were not utilized according to their capacity or training, nor was any attempt made to test or develop their potentialities. They also knew that many of the graduate engineers were, therefore, dissatisfied with their work life. Some of them who did not get equal promotional opportunities as their colleagues placed in other departments, were looking for better jobs elsewhere.

On the other hand, according to management, the young graduate engineers were themselves partly responsible for the hostile attitude of others in the organization. Some of them failed to appreciate that a newcomer invited hostility in the beginning and it took time before he was accepted as a member of the work-group. They did not realize that they would be fully productive only after gaining about five to seven years experience in the organization. A few thought that they belonged to a superior cadre and threw their weight around. They did not bother to understand and appreciate the problems of the rank-and-file of employees who worked under them.

In spite of these drawback, the General Manager of the company felt that these men were a set of disciplined supervisors. They had a sense of pride in their profession, and with the extensive training they had received, they would be able to take up any responsible position in the organization in course of time.

The General Manager could not allow the situation to continue especially when it was a difficult and costly process to recruit and train young engineering graduates of the requisite type and caliber. He knew that the prosperity of the company, to a large extent, depended on these young men. In addition, a large number of lucrative employment opportunities were available to these young engineers elsewhere and there was a systematic raid on them, He, therefore, called a meeting of all heads of departments to review the situation.

s:(i) Identify the issues related to manpower planning as evident in the case.

'ManPower Planning' plays an important role in Human Resource Management THE  APPROACH  IS  NOT  RIGHT.

THERE  IS  LACK OF   RESEARCH. ALL DECISIONS   ARE   BASED  ON ASSUMPTIONS.

MANPOWER  PLANNING   SHOULD  COME  OUT  THE   TOTAL   ‘’HUMAN  RESOURCE  PLANNING’’.

HR  PLANNING   in  HR  MANAGEMENT   IS  A  process by which an organisation ensures that it has the right number & kind of people at the right place and at the right time, capable of effectively and efficiently completing those tasks that help the organisation achieve its overall objectives..

Manpower  planning  is   an  element  of   HR PLANNING.

which  is  the  process of  identifying   the  gap  between  

-WHAT  IS  THE  CURRENT   BUSINESS SITUATION/ CURRENT  MANPOWER

AND -WHAT  IS  THE  FUTURE  BUSINESS SITUATION /  MANPOWER  NEEDS

AND

-DEVELOPING    A  PLAN  TO  FILL  THE  GAP  WITH

*numbers  of  additional  workers/staff / managers etc

*skills  of  different  levels

*flexibility  in  job  handling

*achieving  equal  employment  opportunities  

*experience- lifting  the  experience  levels

*capabilities-- improving  capabilities  for  performance

* increase  potential  of people

*training

etc etc

==============================================

Importance  of  HR/ manpower PLANNING

•    1)   Each Organisation needs personnel with necessary qualifications, skills, knowledge, experience & aptitude .

•    2)   Need for Replacement of Personnel -  Replacing old, retired or disabled personnel.

•    3)   Meet manpower shortages due to labour turnover •    4)   Meet needs of expansion / downsizing programmes •    5)   Cater to Future Personnel Needs •    6)   Nature of present workforce in relation with Changing Environment - helps to cope with changes in competitive forces, markets, technology, products and government regulations.      Shift in demand from ERP to internet programming has increased internet programmers .

ALSO  INCLUDES

i)  quantify job for producing product / service    

ii) quantify people & positions required

ii) determine future staff-mix

iii) assess staffing levels to avoid unnecessary costs

iv) reduce delays in procuring staff

v) prevent shortage / excess of staff vi) comply with legal requirements

-------------------------------------------------------------

MANPOWER     PLANNING   HAS   AN  IMPORTANT  ROLE  

IN  HR  MANAGEMENT,  BECAUSE  IT  PROVIDES

??Forecasting future manpower requirements, where we

use mathematical projections  to project trends in the economic environment and development of the industry. ??Making an inventory of present manpower resources

and assessing the extent to which these resources are

employed optimally.

** Procuring competent personnel

requires positive recruitment efforts and the development

of a variety of recruitment sources. These sources must

consider not only the nature and conditions of the external

labor market, but also the presence of qualified personnel

who are available to fill vacancies through internal

promotions or transfers.

Keep in mind the recruitment activities is integrated with

diversity and equal employment opportunity initiatives.

Staffing needs must be anticipated sufficiently in advance to

permit the recruitment and development of fully qualified

personnel.

??Anticipating manpower problems by projecting

present resources into the future and comparing them

with the forecast of requirements to determine their

adequacy, both quantitatively and qualitatively; ??Planning the necessary programmes of requirement,

selection, training, development, utilization, transfer,

promotion, motivation and compensation to ensure that

future manpower requirements are properly met.

**It’s a systematic approach. because it ensures a

continuous and proper staffing. It avoids or checks on

occupational imbalances(shortage or surplus) occurring in

any of the department of the organization.

**There is a visible continuity in the process. **There is a certain degree of flexibility. That is, it is subject

to modifications according to needs of the organization or

the changing circumstances. Manpower plans can be done

at micro or the macro levels depending upon various

environmental factors.

IT  is a kind of risk management. It involves realistically

appraising the present and anticipating the future(as far as

possible) in order to get the right people into right jobs at the

right time”. **Ensures optimum use of man(woman, too nowadays?)

power and capitalize on the strength of HR. The

organization can have a reservoir of talent at any point of

time. People skills are readily available to carry out the

assigned tasks, if the information is collected and arranged

beforehand.

??Forecast future requirements(this is done by keeping track

of the employee turnover.) and provides control measures

about availability of HR labor time. If, for example the

organization wants to expand its scale of operations, it can

go ahead easily. Advance planning ensures a continuous

supply of people with requisite skills who can handle

challenging jobs easily.

??Help determine recruitment/induction levels. ??To anticipate redundancies/surpluses/obsolescence.

??To determine training levels and works as a foundation for

management development programmes

**Planning facilitates preparation of an appropriate manpower

budget for each department or division. This, in turn, helps in

controlling manpower costs by avoiding shortages/excesses in

manpower supply.

=======================================

MANPOWER  PLANNING   ROLE  IN  HR  MANAGEMENT

TAKES   INTO     CONSIDERATION, THE  FOLLOWING

1.The  impact  of  technological  change on task needs.

2. Variations in the  efficiency, productivity, flexibility  of  labor  as  a result  of  training, work study  organizational change, new motivations, etc.

3. Changes  in  employment practices [ e.g. subcontractors  or       outsourcing  etc ]

4.Other  variations due to  new legislations like new health requirements,    safety  requirements etc.

5.Changes  in  government policies   like  tax/ tariff etc 6. Labor  demand  and  supply .

7. Skills   levels   availability

What should  emerge from  this  analysis / reviews  is a   "thought out"   

and  logical  staffing  demand  schedule for  varying dates  in the future

which  can then  be  compared  with  the  crude  supply   schedule.

The  comparison will then  indicate  what steps must be taken to achieve a balance.

=========================================== MANPOWER  planning increased in importance IN  HR  MANAGEMENT

DUE  TO  

-globalization

-strong/ speedy  economic  growth

-demand  for  skilled  workers

-mobility  of  workers

-need  for  productivity  improvements

-need  for   efficient  growth

-diversity  in  workforce

-forward  planning  of  resorces

-provides   a  planned  hr resources

-controls   wastage.

etc etc

==================================

MANPOWER    PLANNING  is a  strategic  process in any  organization ,

in any  country.

All  MANPOWER   planning , in good times and  in not  so good  times, are  

strategic  processes.

BUSINESS  ORGANIZATIONS  do  not  exist  in vacuum  but  function

in a dynamic  environment, both internally  / externally. Many factors

impact  the   organization's  business.

1.ENVIRONMENTAL

-environmental  regulations

-consumer  protection

-safety  regulations

2.POLITICAL

-tax policies

-trade  regulations

-trade restrictions

-contract enforcement laws

-employment laws

-government  attitudes

-political  stability

-competitive regulations

3.ECONOMIC -economic  growth

-demand  situation

-supply  situation

-competition

4. SOCIAL

-Demographic  changes

-lifestyle  changes

-educational  impact

5.TECHNOLOGY

-changes  in  technology

-innovations technology

6.INTERNAL  -- STRENGTHS

-products

-sales coverage

-distribution

-marketing -supply  chain

etc

7.INTERNAL - WEAKNESS

-HR -finance

-manufacturing

etc

8. INTERNAL  -OPPORTUNITIES

-product  mix

-geographical coverage

-image

-brand

etc etc

9.INTERNAL - THREAT

-local competition

-imports

etc etc

The above factors  affect  the  organization   business  in  many

ways, depending  on  the  situation.

As  the  organization  gears  itself  to  meet  its  objectives,

it  needs   a  strategy  or  strategies.

The  adopted   corporate  strategy  sets  the  guidelines  for  

the  needs/ availability  of  resources.

HENCE,  HR  one  of  the  major resources,   NEEDS  TO  DEVELOP   A  STRATEGY.

THIS  IS  DEVELOPED   AND  IMPLEMENTED  THROUGH

MANPOWER    PLANNING.

============================

######################################################################

(ii) Discuss the strategies to tackle the percentage of internal promotion at the organizational level.

1.THE  INTERNAL  PROMOTION  IS  NOT   PROPERLY  PLANNED.

2.IT  SHOULD  BE  BASED   ON  MERIT  ALONE.

-experience

-skills

-knowledge

-competences

-potential.

3.THERE  MUST  BE  AN  INTERNAL   PROMOTION  POLICY.

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

(iii)What type of additional training programmes should be imparted for direct entrants?

1.PEOPLE   MANAGEMENT  SKILLS.

2.SUPERVISORY  SKILLS.

3.PUBLIC  SPEAKING  MASTERY.

4.EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION  & HUMAN  RELATIONS  AND  SKILLS  FOR  SUCCESS.

5.BUSINESS  COMMUNICATION SKILLS

6.DEVELOPING  A  SELF  CONFIDENT   ASSERTIVE  ATTITUDE  --THE  WAY  TO  ASSERTIVE.

7.PERSUASION  COMMUNICATION  SKILLS FOR  MANAGERS

8.EFFECTIVE  PROBLEM  SOLVING  / DECISION  MAKING

9.DEVELOPING  THE  LEADER  IN  YOU.

10.SKILLS  FOR  TEAM SUCCESS.

11.ON  THE  JOB  COACHING.

12.INTERPERSONAL  SKILLS @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

(iv) Suppose you are the head of the personnel division. What would be your suggestions in the meeting - Which has been called by the General Manager?

MY   SUGGESTIONS

1.DEVELOP   A  COMPLETE   CORPORATE   PLANNING.

2.FROM  THAT  HR  WILL  DEVELOP  THE  HR  PLANNING.

3.FROM  THAT  , HELP  THE  VARIOUS  DEPARTMENT   TO  DEVELOP  THEIR  RESPECTIVE  MANPOWER  PLAN.

4.THEN,  COMPILE THE  TOTAL  MANPOWER  PLAN.

5.DEVELOP   A  RECRUITMENT/ SELECTION  PLAN.

-screen  all  applicants’   application.

-conduct  an  aptitude  test.

-conduct  a  psychological  test.

-conduct  a  written  test.

-conduct  an initial  interview.

MAKE  A  SHORT  LIST. THEN  BRING THE SENIOR   MANAGERS  FOR  THE  FINAL  INTERVIEWS.

################################  
Matro
 
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Feb 23, 2014 1:54 pm


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