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Do i need to take both the LSAT and the gmat test to get into law school and do a joint program?

Corporate Law Discussions

Do i need to take both the LSAT and the gmat test to get into law school and do a joint program?

Postby shipley » Tue Nov 22, 2011 4:57 am

Im a sophomore in college now and have been planning on going to law school after. as an accounting major, i wanted to go into corporate law and was thinking about doing the joint program that gives you a JD/MBA degree. so do i need to take both the lsat and gmat tests to do this?
and what schools would be best to go to? i want to try to stay in the new york area so i was thinking either st. johns, hofstra, brooklyn, or fordham. since those might be a little easier to get into than NYU, columbia, or schools like that.
shipley
 
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Do i need to take both the LSAT and the gmat test to get into law school and do a joint program?

Postby dubh35 » Tue Nov 22, 2011 5:05 am

Im a sophomore in college now and have been planning on going to law school after. as an accounting major, i wanted to go into corporate law and was thinking about doing the joint program that gives you a JD/MBA degree. so do i need to take both the lsat and gmat tests to do this?
and what schools would be best to go to? i want to try to stay in the new york area so i was thinking either st. johns, hofstra, brooklyn, or fordham. since those might be a little easier to get into than NYU, columbia, or schools like that.
Most joint JD/MBA programs require you to be admitted to each program separately, so you'll need to take both the LSAT and the GMAT.

Also, have you considered simply taking a few more accounting courses to sit for the Uniform CPA Exam before going to law school? The reason I ask is because law school and MBA programs are expensive enough separately, but by completing the programs together, you'll be in school for another four years beyond your undergraduate degree, which will be very expensive at graduate tuition rates. Becoming a CPA (which requires both passing the CPA Exam and working for a year or two, depending on the state you're in) is just as prestigious as holding a MBA. And if you don't get your MBA from a top school, don't expect it to help you too much. Again, these are just a few thoughts, so don't think you necessarily have to go the route I denoted to reach your goals; they're simply suggestions.

Best of luck!
dubh35
 
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