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Deadbeat Client

Discuss anything relating to Consumer Law

Deadbeat Client

Postby Dumont » Sun Nov 27, 2016 10:10 am

I own a small Service company in Chicago.  I have completed services for a client in Texas. I've overly exceeded every expectation.  The staff of my client praised my good work.  Everything was wonderful until I sent him the bill.  The contract stated that I would provide staffing at $15 per hour per person.  I had scheduled 4 people for the 1st day of the conference and my client indicated that this would not be enough since he was expecting approximately 2000 onsite attendees.  I brought in an additional 4 people. When I sent him the bill - he furiously told me he thought the bill was too high and he refused to pay.  Before the event, he gave me a deposit of $2500(as stated in the contract).  He was late in sending me the $2500, so he just gave me his credit card number instead of mailing a check which is how most of my clients pay.  My bills were mounting because of him not paying me and so I charged the credit card he gave me previously.  He wrote me a letter accusing me of charging his credit card without his authorization.  He threatened to have the Texas Attorney General close my business down.  I've never had this happen to me before, and so to avoid problems when I had no time to deal with it, I reversed the charges.  Since then I've tried to contact him, I've sent him invoices and he has never replied.  I've called my attorney, but he says I need to find a lawyer in Texas to handle my case.  In total, this client still owes me

approximately $16,000.00.  My bills are mounting and I'm on the verge of bankruptcy.  I'd like to take him to court on this, but I can't afford any lawyer fees.  Any suggestions will be very much appreciated !
Dumont
 
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 12:50 pm

Deadbeat Client

Postby Eldur » Sun Nov 27, 2016 1:34 pm

I own a small Service company in Chicago.  I have completed services for a client in Texas. I've overly exceeded every expectation.  The staff of my client praised my good work.  Everything was wonderful until I sent him the bill.  The contract stated that I would provide staffing at $15 per hour per person.  I had scheduled 4 people for the 1st day of the conference and my client indicated that this would not be enough since he was expecting approximately 2000 onsite attendees.  I brought in an additional 4 people. When I sent him the bill - he furiously told me he thought the bill was too high and he refused to pay.  Before the event, he gave me a deposit of $2500(as stated in the contract).  He was late in sending me the $2500, so he just gave me his credit card number instead of mailing a check which is how most of my clients pay.  My bills were mounting because of him not paying me and so I charged the credit card he gave me previously.  He wrote me a letter accusing me of charging his credit card without his authorization.  He threatened to have the Texas Attorney General close my business down.  I've never had this happen to me before, and so to avoid problems when I had no time to deal with it, I reversed the charges.  Since then I've tried to contact him, I've sent him invoices and he has never replied.  I've called my attorney, but he says I need to find a lawyer in Texas to handle my case.  In total, this client still owes me

approximately $16,000.00.  My bills are mounting and I'm on the verge of bankruptcy.  I'd like to take him to court on this, but I can't afford any lawyer fees.  Any suggestions will be very much appreciated !
Eldur
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2014 1:20 am

Deadbeat Client

Postby Jacobo » Thu Dec 01, 2016 2:28 pm

I'm afraid you will need an attorney in TX to file the suit but even that doesn't guarantee you will get paid. If he is self employed you may have a hard time attaching income other than his bank accounts(if you can find them). Getting a judgment is the easy part. Collecting your money can be a nightmare, especially in TX, which is pro consumer. But don't despair, you can still collect your money, it just may take a while and cost you a bit to do so.

Your best option is to bite the bullet and offer a settlement to your client at a discount for quick payment. This is quicker and cheaper than filing suit. You may lose some money but a peace of something is better than all of nothing.

Good luck.
Jacobo
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Jan 19, 2014 2:10 pm


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