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Constant Crying Of Autistic Child

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Constant Crying Of Autistic Child

Postby Zarad » Sat Nov 26, 2016 10:23 am

Hello, I am an one-on-one assistant for a child who is 14, nonverbal, autistic, and has had brain surgery to resolve the issue of seizure activity.  Overall since I have been with him he has improved socially and academically(yet is still considered low functioning).  My question and main concern is the child's constant crying.  Mostly he cries for food, for example when the class is getting ready for lunch he will sit there in high anticipation screaming and crying, when everyday he knows he cannot go to the cafeteria until he is quite.  Like all, some days are good, but the majority are filled with these tantrum like episodes.  When it comes to any standing activity he cries, vocational task, or anything where work and concentration is need.  In his previous district he was wheeled around the school and not made to do anything and given candy and snacks when he started to cry.  So we are trying to break bad habits, but it has now been a year and a half.  I have tried positive reinforcement, removal from group and made to work or personal quite time.  I am out of ideas and am looking for some more insight.  Any ideas would be great on how to break the crying cycle!
Zarad
 
Posts: 48
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 5:07 am

Constant Crying Of Autistic Child

Postby edmondo93 » Sun Nov 27, 2016 12:02 am

Hi there, Majorie!

Along with a RL strain on my time, this was also a hard question to answer. So I do hope you'll forgive how long it ended up being delayed while I got a couple things straightened out!

The main reason this one is so hard to answer is that there are not always a lot of ways that something like this can be easily solved. As you said, the child may well recognize that the he cannot go, and yet he finds himself in tears while waiting. Because he is in tears, he now realizes that he has to wait even longer, which brings about more frustration and on top of that more tears. Also, as you have pointed out, he spent a long time of being treated for these episodes, thus reinforcing that they are the 'proper' way to act. When he is not quickly answered, then he is acting out more, both out of anger and because of being taught it's the 'appropriate' way to ask for these things.

One thing that you haven't mentioned: have things around the crying been actually improving at all, or is it a state of 'absolutely no improvement' in this case? One thing that you can do with this is to try and simply make it a schedule. Instead of rewarding his crying or punishing it, simply give him some quiet time and, when it is time to go to lunch, bring him there. Obviously if he is in a tantrum state, it will have to be delayed some. Still, making things a solid schedule will help with the idea that "Lunchtime is at noon." For an autistic mind, this can sometimes be a very soothing thing: you know exactly when things are going to happen. Crying doesn't make it any faster. It happens at the proper time. As for the others, it is unfortunately a lot more difficult. Remember that he is 14 years old, and has had a lot of years to get into these bad habits. It is very possible that equally, *he* is having trouble getting out of the habits. Do you know if his parents at home are trying to reinforce these ideals as well? Or is the only place that he is having to do any of this at school? Having them join in around home with some of the expectations would help out some. That is to say, he should at home be expected to do his own walking, his own focusing, et cetera. http://www.essortment.com/all/highfunctioning_repx.htm

Although listed for high-functioning children, this is some good, detailed suggestions for how to work with autistic children. http://www.brighttots.com/Autism/Low_Functioning_Autism

More definition than direct suggestions, there is still an area in the middle that gives some tips toward education, and some detail on 'what to consider'.

Depending on where you are, there may be some organizations in your area who can also help with more direct assistance on the matter. You can check Google or Bing, or let me know your general area and I can see what I can find in my list. I wish I could give more information, and I can only hope what I have given will help at least a little. I know that it's a frustrating situation and I know you'll manage to get the better of it. And so will he!

s, comments, feedback, follow-ups? Feel free!

Trey  
edmondo93
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2011 7:03 pm

Constant Crying Of Autistic Child

Postby Walwyn » Wed Nov 30, 2016 12:53 am

Hello, I am an one-on-one assistant for a child who is 14, nonverbal, autistic, and has had brain surgery to resolve the issue of seizure activity.  Overall since I have been with him he has improved socially and academically(yet is still considered low functioning).  My question and main concern is the child's constant crying.  Mostly he cries for food, for example when the class is getting ready for lunch he will sit there in high anticipation screaming and crying, when everyday he knows he cannot go to the cafeteria until he is quite.  Like all, some days are good, but the majority are filled with these tantrum like episodes.  When it comes to any standing activity he cries, vocational task, or anything where work and concentration is need.  In his previous district he was wheeled around the school and not made to do anything and given candy and snacks when he started to cry.  So we are trying to break bad habits, but it has now been a year and a half.  I have tried positive reinforcement, removal from group and made to work or personal quite time.  I am out of ideas and am looking for some more insight.  Any ideas would be great on how to break the crying cycle!
Walwyn
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Jan 10, 2014 5:26 am


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