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Carcass Disposal

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Carcass Disposal

Postby Fflergant » Mon Dec 05, 2016 10:30 pm

Thank you for the advice- very helpful.  Couple followup questions.  First, have you ever heard of anyone eating coyote?  Second, I was wondering if it is necessary to field dress coyote if you intend to take them home to skin.  ------------------------- Followup To - How should I go about disposing of coyote carcasses after I skin them?  Is it bad etiquette to skin them at the kill site and bury them?  How about if I skin them at home?
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Carcass Disposal

Postby Roth » Tue Dec 06, 2016 12:09 pm

Well Joseph, actually I did talk to a fella one time who told me that he had tried eating coyote... Said he fried up some steaks and also tried a little of it BBQ'ed. Said he did not care for it either way, and threw it out to his dogs...who wouldn't eat it either... But some cultures do eat dogs, and I would suppose that coyote would not be all that much different... But, I have never tried it, and have never had any desire to...... As to field dressing coyotes... No, you don't want to do this as it would ruin your fur. Coyotes are case skinned, or as some people call it, "socked out". Handleing the fur any differently would considerably lower, or even eliminate, any chance of selling it... If you plan to take the coyote home to skin, then after dispatching, just lay it in your truck or however you are hauling it, and take it home... If you plan to collect the urine for use on your trap lines, then you may want to consider placeing a 2X4 or other object under the rear of the coyote to keep it elevated, so the urine does not run out. Then, after skinning, while the coyote is still hanging upside down, you can make a small vertical incision of 3 to 4 inches long, just barely thru the muscles of the lower stomach,(carefully, and only deep enough to get thru the muscles, exposeing the insides) just lower than where the legs come together, and a couple of inches to one side or the other of center. Looking inside you will see a small opaque bag hanging down with the urine in it... This is the bladder... Pinch the top of the bladder closed, and slice thru it just above your pinch. Then you can turn it up and drain it into a bottle or jar for use on your lines...If you have decided to collect the glands you can add the empty bladder to these..... Joseph, if you are not sure of how to skin an animal something you might think about is selling them "in the round". This means just selling the entire animal, unskinned. Most buyers will also buy this way........ Just a suggestion here, but if you have a fur buyer near by, you might consider going and talking to him about fur handleing. Most of these fellas are more than glad to have a fella to talk to while they work, and will share their experience and knowledge... Many years ago, shortly after I first started trapping I got to know an older fella who was a local fur buyer. He bought and put up the fur from many trappers and fur hunters in this area, and then sold them to an international market... I spent many hours just hanging around his old barn watching him work the fur. Mostly I just watched and listened to him and the older, more experienced fellas as they dickered over prices, talked trapping, fur, traps, lures, the market, ect. I ran errands for him, and helped out where I could, and as time went by, I learned about quality, primeness, sizes, types, colorations, making repairs, ect., how to properly skin different animals, fleshing and stretching.... Just something you might think about........ And Joseph, like I told you... If you have any more questions, I am as close as your computer... Have a good day.          Mongo  
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Carcass Disposal

Postby Zed » Wed Dec 07, 2016 8:50 pm

Thank you for the advice- very helpful.  Couple followup questions.  First, have you ever heard of anyone eating coyote?  Second, I was wondering if it is necessary to field dress coyote if you intend to take them home to skin.  ------------------------- Followup To - How should I go about disposing of coyote carcasses after I skin them?  Is it bad etiquette to skin them at the kill site and bury them?  How about if I skin them at home?
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Carcass Disposal

Postby Donato » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:50 am

- Hello Joseph.... To begin, it really doesn't matter where you skin them. I would not do it right beside my sets, but if there is an area handy and close by, and you want to get it done, go ahead. Or, if you are only running a few traps, and only have a few animals to skin, then you can do it when you get home in the afternoon or evening... Burying them is one way to dispose of the carcass... Another method you may want to consider is a "carcass dump". All of the larger ranches and farms, and most of the smaller ones that I have trapped on have one or more places where they drag animals that have died or had to be put down for one reason or another. You may check with the land owners about this possibility... Also these carcass dumps are a natural draw for coyotes. You can bet that every coyote in the country knows where they are located, and visits them regularly. The immediate area of the carcass dump is another good location for putting in a few coyote sets. These carcass dumps would be my first choice... I know you were asking about coyotes, but consider other animals you may also catch... For instance, I had a few older fellas that were glad to have any coon carcasses I had. They also took many of the possums. After I skinned them and had them hanging anyway, I removed the entrails, and put the carcasses in plastic bags and took to the gentlemen. They ate them. Some folks may be happy to get your beavers and muskrats also, for table fare... You may even want to try some of these animals yourself... Also, after skinning, your beaver and bobcat will make for some fine chunk bait. And if you are so inclined, you can locate and remove the various glands from coyote, fox or bobcat, and try your hand at makeing your own gland lure. And don't forget to collect the urine for use on your lines. And the castors and oil sacks from your beaver make up into the best beaver lure you can get.......... One word here... I advise to always wear plastic or rubber gloves when skinning or cleaning any animals. Better to be safe than sorry. I just pick up a box of the surgical rubber gloves at the drug store. They come in boxes of 100 and are very inexpencive. After you are finished skinning, just toss the used gloves away..... I hope this is of help to you Joseph...If there anything else I can help you with, give me a holler.          Mongo
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