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Becoming A Police Officer

Discussions relating to Personal Injury Law

Becoming A Police Officer

Postby Perce » Wed Nov 30, 2016 9:00 pm

Westpoint just before he had an epileptic seizure. His lifelong dream of becoming an army officer was taken away. It was a very difficult time for him, but he decided to go to ASU, major in Justice Studies, and become a detective. He recently suffered another seizure, after 2 yrs. of being seizure free, and is now(in his junior year) very worried about pursuing this career goal. Can you give us any guidance? Thanks so much.

ANSWER: Jean,

I am not sure that your whole question came through but I will try and go with what I think it is you wanted to write.

I take it that someone you know wanted to be an Army Officer and was appointed to Westpoint but before he got to go he had an Epileptic seizure. And this put an end to that career dream. I am very sorry about that, it must have been devastating. I then take it that he went to college and majored in  Justice Studies as he wanted to be a detective. But he recently suffered another seizure and he is worried this will prevent him from becoming a police officer and you are asking for some guidance.

Well I know you submitted this a couple of days ago, but as it was the weekend I wanted to wait until monday to answer your question so I could check with a few police departments on their policies on this type of situation.

I spoke to several and they say its almost always on a case by case basis. They look for things like, the epilepsy is controlled by medication, that is almost always OK. The longer the time from the last seizure, it seems that that makes it OK. One department told me that if this person could pass all the testing, which includes a physical(the doctor would have to sign off that he is fit for the job) then they could not disqualify him on that basis.

I got the impression from the agencies that this was not something that happened very often and several have no policies to deal with it at all, and would take it on a case by case basis.

My suggestions are that he contact whatever agency he is interested in applying to and before he applies, ask them their policy on hiring someone with epilepsy and what the criteria are for disqualification based on that. Ask them is he OK if he is taking meds to control it and has not had a seizure in 2 years? That kind of thing.

You know I know that this may not be what you or him want to hear but has he ever thought about the hundreds of civilian areas in law enforcement? Many agencies have civilian positions that are very very interesting. Some departments use civilians to do crime scene(CSI type work). Crisis Intervention, Victim Services, and a few more areas. Has he considered a position with Department Of Homeland Security? They have hundreds of jobs that do not require being a police officer, yet are very very closely related. Go to www.usajobs.gov and type in the area he is interested in, in the search bar. Check this one out where I typed in "investigations".http://jobsearch.usajobs.gov/jobsearch.asp?sort=rv&vw=d&brd=3876&ss=0&customappl

Tell him not to get down, he can still be involved in law enforcement from what I am hearing from the departments, and he can always, because of his degree, go into the Federal side of criminal justice. He just needs to look hard enough and long enough to find that perfect job for him and his skills. Also tell him, I broke my back twice while in the military, and was still able to get a job as a police officer, and passed all the testing. If I can do it with that, he can do it also. I have no doubts.

Good luck and stay safe and check out those Federal jobs!!

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

Commander Wagoner,

You have no idea how much I appreciate your taking the time to research your answer to me. That is what I've had a hard time getting.....a researched answer! If it wouldn't be too much trouble would you mind letting me know what police departments you spoke to so that I can start my checking there. Also, you mentioned the federal side of criminal justice. I assumed they would have equally, if not more, rigorous requirements. Thank you so much for your time. You've given us hope when we didn't think there was any!  Jean
Perce
 
Posts: 33
Joined: Tue Feb 04, 2014 6:28 am

Becoming A Police Officer

Postby Schaeffer » Fri Dec 02, 2016 4:21 am

Westpoint just before he had an epileptic seizure. His lifelong dream of becoming an army officer was taken away. It was a very difficult time for him, but he decided to go to ASU, major in Justice Studies, and become a detective. He recently suffered another seizure, after 2 yrs. of being seizure free, and is now(in his junior year) very worried about pursuing this career goal. Can you give us any guidance? Thanks so much.

ANSWER: Jean,

I am not sure that your whole question came through but I will try and go with what I think it is you wanted to write.

I take it that someone you know wanted to be an Army Officer and was appointed to Westpoint but before he got to go he had an Epileptic seizure. And this put an end to that career dream. I am very sorry about that, it must have been devastating. I then take it that he went to college and majored in  Justice Studies as he wanted to be a detective. But he recently suffered another seizure and he is worried this will prevent him from becoming a police officer and you are asking for some guidance.

Well I know you submitted this a couple of days ago, but as it was the weekend I wanted to wait until monday to answer your question so I could check with a few police departments on their policies on this type of situation.

I spoke to several and they say its almost always on a case by case basis. They look for things like, the epilepsy is controlled by medication, that is almost always OK. The longer the time from the last seizure, it seems that that makes it OK. One department told me that if this person could pass all the testing, which includes a physical(the doctor would have to sign off that he is fit for the job) then they could not disqualify him on that basis.

I got the impression from the agencies that this was not something that happened very often and several have no policies to deal with it at all, and would take it on a case by case basis.

My suggestions are that he contact whatever agency he is interested in applying to and before he applies, ask them their policy on hiring someone with epilepsy and what the criteria are for disqualification based on that. Ask them is he OK if he is taking meds to control it and has not had a seizure in 2 years? That kind of thing.

You know I know that this may not be what you or him want to hear but has he ever thought about the hundreds of civilian areas in law enforcement? Many agencies have civilian positions that are very very interesting. Some departments use civilians to do crime scene(CSI type work). Crisis Intervention, Victim Services, and a few more areas. Has he considered a position with Department Of Homeland Security? They have hundreds of jobs that do not require being a police officer, yet are very very closely related. Go to www.usajobs.gov and type in the area he is interested in, in the search bar. Check this one out where I typed in "investigations".http://jobsearch.usajobs.gov/jobsearch.asp?sort=rv&vw=d&brd=3876&ss=0&customappl

Tell him not to get down, he can still be involved in law enforcement from what I am hearing from the departments, and he can always, because of his degree, go into the Federal side of criminal justice. He just needs to look hard enough and long enough to find that perfect job for him and his skills. Also tell him, I broke my back twice while in the military, and was still able to get a job as a police officer, and passed all the testing. If I can do it with that, he can do it also. I have no doubts.

Good luck and stay safe and check out those Federal jobs!!

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

Commander Wagoner,

You have no idea how much I appreciate your taking the time to research your answer to me. That is what I've had a hard time getting.....a researched answer! If it wouldn't be too much trouble would you mind letting me know what police departments you spoke to so that I can start my checking there. Also, you mentioned the federal side of criminal justice. I assumed they would have equally, if not more, rigorous requirements. Thank you so much for your time. You've given us hope when we didn't think there was any!  Jean
Schaeffer
 
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Jan 14, 2014 3:43 am

Becoming A Police Officer

Postby Adoeete » Mon Dec 05, 2016 3:01 am

Hi Jean,

I spoke to my local departments here in North Central Florida, the Alachua County Sheriff's Office(human resources dept), Gainesville Police Department(same) and the Santa Fe Community College Police Department(my own department, I asked the Chief)and I also spoke to the college HR and they seemed to think along the same lines.

I am not sure where you are but I would call your local police and sheriff's office and see if they even have a policy that covers hiring someone with epilepsy. I found that most do not and its addressed on a case by case basis. As for the Federal agencies having more rigorous requirements, while you would think that, its generally not the case. Sad to say but thats how it is. He may want to look into the TSA, they are hiring like crazy. There are so many jobs for people with any criminal Justice education or background it should be easy to find one. I think your big issue will be getting a doctor to sign off that its either controlled by medication or the last attack is years ago and the likelihood of another is very remote.

You know you say that you did not think there was any hope, NEVER think that way based on a disability or an injury. On the personal side, I had a very severe back injury while I the Army. I rehabbed, finished my time in the military on active service, got out and was hired as a Deputy Sheriff and have been in law enforcement ever since. Does it hurt? Yes, Does it bother me a lot, yes, but it will not stop me from doing what I love. Tell him to never let something like his epilepsy stop him from achieving what he can. All he has to do is look hard enough and in the right places and talk to the right people, it may take longer to get there, but for me that makes the trip that much better when I reach the end. Good luck..
Adoeete
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2014 7:35 pm


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