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1980 Cadillac

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1980 Cadillac

Postby Kevis » Sat Nov 26, 2016 8:18 pm

HI Rob

I purchased a 1980 Cadillac Coupe DeVille De Elegance. It has the standard 368 cu in engine with 4 barrel carburator It is not a show car but definetly draws attention. What are my options for an inexpensive theft prevention system. Im thinking of the device that locks the steering wheel to the brake pedal .

Thanks

Kevin
Kevis
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2014 8:11 am

1980 Cadillac

Postby alburt » Sat Nov 26, 2016 9:18 pm

Hello,

You are using an oxymoron here. You are asking for an inexpensive effective anti theft device. The first problem is that anything attaching to the steering wheel is not only cumbersome and a pain to install and remove is that you are attaching to a very week point. The steering wheel is made of wire and plastic. In A&E's "Stealing Wheels" where I had been featured because of my extensive background in repairing theft recovered vehicles(primarily GMs) I held a club in one hand and a cut steering wheel in the other. The makers of the Club(Winner International) called me after that piece and told me Karen Winner was not happy with my portrayal of their product. I told them that I was not happy having to go to a junk yard and trying to find the same color steering wheel for a replacement. They bragged about selling 25 million clubs. All I did was ask; and how does that correlate with stopping theft. I stated there were just 25 million suckers.

The other problem is once one of these devices is removed, the thief now has a weapon to use on the owner of the vehicle and it has happened!

I am aware of what you are referring to and the issue remains the same.

Your steering column can be defeated in 30 seconds with a screwdriver from a teenager that learned how to do this in jail. The left side of the steering column is vulnerable to access the locking mechanisms(We rebuilt over 10,000 of these steering columns)and grossed millions over the years. No damage to the ignition lock which is also inferior. After time, because of wear the key will come out in any lock position and a key is no longer needed to turn the ignition.

Most of the so called anti theft systems are one size fits all and designed by people that have no clue as to how vehicles are stolen. They don't care if these products work and it is all about marketability. If some potential customer thinks the product will work, that is the main goal. The best way to describe these devices in my opinion is "JUNK."

The best thing you could do is install a hidden starter disable. This is accomplished by using an unmouted toggle with wires spliced into the start circuit of the electrical ignition switch under the dash at the steering column wiring. If mounted under the dash, the first place a thief looks for a switch is the dash.

You may consider going to an alarm store and inquire about a paging system with a starter disable. This way you are notified of a break in. No siren, because no one cares about a siren going off any way.

Bottom line, if you want to waste money on the steering wheel to break pedal lock, you will find it a waste of money because the time you did not put it on, the car is stolen, or there is the challenge factor to a thief that just brings another tool with him(a side cutters) and now you need a setting wheel and good luck finding a good one. The plastic on these steering wheels deteriated and literally stink and most used wheels are not worth the trouble of putting on without a steering wheel cover.

GM from 1969-1994 used the Saginaw steering column on all their vehicles and Chrysler and many other vehicles used this column. These columns were pitifully simple to defeat and I am one of the very rare few that knows how to rebuild them. Another common problem with this column is people would hang on the column getting in and out of the car, causing them to become loose requiring the steering column to be disassembled to tighten the 4 bolts that came loose. The junk yards have many of these loose columns and sometimes so bad the upper and lower portions seperate and steering is lot.

Good luck!http://www.autotheftexpert.com

We are the leaders in strategy to refute denied denied auto theft claims in which an insurance company paid forensic locksmith accuses the insured of having involvement with the theft f their vehicle by stating the vehicle was last driven with a key of the proper type. It is our opinion that these experts are the pinnacle of consumer fraud by defrauding their locksmith background and testifying speculatively as fact as to the methods a car thief would employ. Commonly hiding by the self-imposed forensic title and knowing that anyone else in the courtroom has no knowledge about auto theft methodology, they testify as to physical evidence they never had.

If anyone has had their vehicle stolen, submitted an insurance claim and are under investigation, subject to an EOU or have been denied, we are the only firm in the world you should contact.

Some feel they need an attorney. The problem is generally, no matter how good the attorney, t is very common for the attorney to have the first case of this type. Go with experience--23 years of experience working exclusively with only these types of cases with a 95% prevailing side rate.
alburt
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Apr 02, 2011 1:29 pm

1980 Cadillac

Postby Victoriano » Fri Dec 02, 2016 12:03 pm

HI Rob

I purchased a 1980 Cadillac Coupe DeVille De Elegance. It has the standard 368 cu in engine with 4 barrel carburator It is not a show car but definetly draws attention. What are my options for an inexpensive theft prevention system. Im thinking of the device that locks the steering wheel to the brake pedal .

Thanks

Kevin
Victoriano
 
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Jan 10, 2014 8:33 pm


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